6 08 2013

Welcome monsoon rain
water flows and melons grow
watching and waitingwee watermelon 7.28.13.

wee watermelon 8.6.13

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Yellow and Red

8 07 2013

Well, its July. Let’s kick it off with a haiku:

Summer heat arrives
in a growing garden of green
yellow and red pop.

yellowandred7.8.13





Summer is here (almost)!

17 06 2013

I know, the summer solstice on June 21st marks the official start of summer. My garden however, doesn’t know that distinction. Roses, peonies, and poppies are blooming; I’m harvesting radishes, lettuce, kale and spinach; and the corn, squash and beans are growing like weeds.  I’m happy to say that the seedlings I started in March are doing great!roses 6.15.13

corn 6.15.13

poppies 6.15.13






2013 Seedlings

22 03 2013

Last year I blogged about the dilemma ‘to seed, or not to seed‘ when planning for a summer vegetable garden. While I didn’t plant from seed last year (because of travel) this year I am. I feel more strongly than ever about knowing where my food comes from.

seedlings
This year I decided to try something from a post I’d recently seen on Pinterest. It suggested that paper towel and toilet paper tubes are perfect for starting seeds. And they are! They don’t cost anything, they can be planted directly in the ground, and using them avoids sending more material to the landfill.
The first step was saving our toilet paper and paper towel tubes for the last few months. Then when it was time to plant seeds I cut each of them down to ~2 inch segments and lined them up in glass baking dishes and filed them with dirt.

I began with the seeds that have the longest germination (tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, etc) and cool season crops (celery, leeks, cauliflower, and the like).  The baking dish works great for watering: I add about a half an inch in the bottom of the dish and the little tubes take it up from the bottom. I cover the dish with another glass baking dish to create a greenhouse effect and place it in a south-facing window. Here’s how it looks:

Celery!

Once the seedlings start getting too tall for their ‘greenhouse’ I pull them out and place them in a separate baking dish without a cover. I’ve filled in the vacancies with successive plantings including lavender, marigolds, and fennel. Believe it or not, I’ve actually run out of tubes! I planted the cucumber seeds in a leftover plastic plant pot from last year’s seedlings. Some of the tubes are starting to unravel though; I’m hoping they’ll hold together until I can put them in the ground. We’ll see!

 





Backyard Chickens!

4 02 2013

Or at least they will be come summer! For now, I have chicks.

Image

In fact, I have four. Our little flock is comprised of two Ameraucanas (who lay blue eggs!), one Buff Orpington, and one Silver Laced Wyandotte. If all goes well, they should be laying by June and I’ll have more fresh eggs than I know what to do with. I’ll also have fresh manure for my vegetable garden and the very best pest control mother nature offers! Not too mention, endless entertainment. I’ll be posting about this new adventure regularly and passing on what I’ve learned for those interested in backyard chickens.





Rain, rain, feel free to stay!

23 05 2012

20120523-182357.jpg
We have had a fairly dry May this year. So when the rain finally did come today, my roses (and veggies) were in heaven. They seem to have a different glow from the rain compared to when I water them. This here ‘Dolly Parton’ rose is a prime example!





Ephemeral Spring Blooms

19 03 2012

In honor of the last day of winter, and the coming spring, today’s post is about gardening.
I came across this post to the Denver Botanic Gardens blog recently, and it made me reflect upon the wonders of the ephemeral. The post, The Importance of the Ephemeral, discusses how bulbs like tulips work and how/why they developed as ephemeral. It’s a quick and interesting read, and it made me think about why I love these ephemeral spring blooms.

Tulips, hyacinths, daffodils, I love them all – but would I love them as much if they bloomed throughout the year? Probably not. Of course the blooms themselves are lovely, but their ephemeral nature is why I love them; they bloom for a short time, and they have a distinct association with a certain time and place. Without that association, without reminding me that the seasons are once again changing, I don’t think these ephemeral blooms would hold the same sway over me.

I’ll enjoy all the tulips, and hyacinths, and daffodils for the brief period of spring when they bloom, and remember them fondly until the same time next year. I hope you will too.

Happy (almost) spring everyone!








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